Power At Work

Gleanings from the Louisville show

New technology was the watchword at February’s National Farm Machinery Show in Kentucky

CUTTING-EDGE SEEDING
John Deere created a stir in Kentucky with the introduction of their ExactEmerge planter. The groundbreaking technology boasts increased accuracy and planting speeds up to 10 m.p.h., allowing farmers to plant more acres in less time, while optimizing their seed investment.

A century of progress in tractor design

Farm tractors have undergone major changes since the early 1900s and, since 1920, the University of Nebraska’s test reports have provided invaluable information about their capabilities. Today, they still offer the best source of comparative data available

by RALPH WINFIELD

By the beginning of the last century, steam-powered traction units had been used extensively to operate threshing units and to break prairie sod, but there was no hope of them replacing the teams of horses that were in use for field tillage work in Ontario and elsewhere.

OPINION: OPA and Hydro One are falling down on the job

Present policies of our utilities are not serving rural customers well and are encouraging large energy users to move away or set up their own generating facilities. And OPA’s off-peak rate increase is just a money-grab from consumers

by RALPH WINFIELD

Some of us remember the home farm being electrified. It saved us carrying lanterns, pumping water and hand-milking cows, as well as cranking the cream separator manually. Electrical energy (or hydro, as we did and still do call it in Ontario) made life a lot easier on the farm.

Time and costs change many good ideas into great ones

Some energy-saving techniques and devices pioneered decades ago are proving their worth in these more energy-conscious times

by RALPH WINFIELD

When I worked for Ontario Hydro in the late 1960s and early 1970s, I made many recommendations for environmental control in poultry and livestock buildings. Do remember that energy, including electrical energy, was relatively cheap in those days.

Keep safety top of mind when working with farm machinery

Try to protect yourself and others from personal injury on the farm. The life you save just might be your own or that of someone you love

by RALPH WINFIELD

Many of us, as farm children, were exposed to numerous safety risks in the barn and around machinery. Fortunately, most of us survived with only a few cuts and bruises. I still have all 10 fingers, but both hands show scars from close calls.

Municipalities need to get the message about rural road design

With farm equipment getting bigger and limited road shoulders more common, the danger of accidents and rollovers on country roads is increasing. Municipal road designers take heed!

by RALPH WINFIELD

Last month, I talked about how farm units are becoming larger to keep the unit cost of production down. By the same token, as farm units get bigger, so does the size of farm equipment that must be moved on the public roadways to travel between farms.

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